Wednesday, July 16, 2014

You are here.

I plan on doing a series of map pieces.
We'll see if it pans out.
I have lots of ideas, but will they stick with me?
Lately, nothing seems to stay that interesting for long . . .

So, here is the first piece in the "maybe" series:


I've always loved maps. 

It's so interesting to see where everything is. In relation to everything else. 

And of course I like to know where *I* am in the vast scheme of things.

This particular map might leave you more lost than you were before.

But a lot of “you are here” maps do that, at least to me.


theme this week is Maps.
 Visit over there to see the other MAPS pieces.

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Sunday, July 13, 2014

Summer is fleeting


Some pictures from my garden.
Flowers this time.
Veggies later.

Nasturtiums


A calla lily that I thought would not come up this year 
after the nasty winter we had.

It has that motto that I like ~
Never ever ever give up.


I planted some Four O’Clocks a little late, 
but I hope it means they'll still be blooming in September.

Here's what they will look like if you are not familiar with them:
Photo courtesy of Burpee.

My grandmother always had four o'clocks in her garden.
It's true ~ they bloom at 4:00 in the afternoon (or thereabouts).
Things were simpler then; we kids thought it was exciting and cool 
that flowers could tell time :-) Kids today might just think it's a big yawn...
More exciting things happening on their smart phones.



I'm gonna have to pay more attention to framing my photos.

Garden implements photobombing both of these pictures lol. 


Lantana


I decided to post these pics now because I just noticed 
that even though these were taken only 4 or so days ago, 
everything has changed already! 

Summer is flying by . . . I guess we are about half through already.

How is your summer going? How does your garden grow?


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Tuesday, July 8, 2014

Studying Duy Huynh

MJJ Month 4 ~ Another Challenge . . .

Each journal I've received in this year's swap has
had its challenging moments!

Tammy's artist is Duy Huynh, a North Carolina artist whose art
is serene, surreal, ethereal, and dreamlike. Oh. I forgot to mention.
It shines with a perfection that is impossible to imitate!
But our task is to give it a try and I had so much fun
with his whimsical subject matter.



I was so frustrated with my first attempts to imitate Mr. Huynh's style, 
until I realized that his backgrounds were brilliantly every bit 
as important as the subject in the foreground.
Once I began concentrating on making the backgrounds
bolder, I was a bit happier with my pieces.


I hardly ever paint any subject matter twice,
but the one above is another version of a painting
from a few years ago:
I didn't set out to make the floating girl look the same.
But darned if she isn't the same girl all grown up!
Different cat, though.
(This one's available in my Etsy shop)

I think this simple balloon painting might be the one I like best.


One last one:


. . . and a tag:

The reverse side says: "Bee Happy"

It's been fun connecting with the different artists that
were chosen by each of us. 
Some, like Duy Huynh, I was not familiar with. 
Now, I would know a painting of his anywhere.
And I'm so glad about that!

Next up is Lisa Wright's Matisse journal.
I've already received it and can't wait to start.
Somehow, I'm thinking Matisse will be a bit easier,
but after 4 journals so far, I know not to even think such a thing.

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Thursday, May 22, 2014

Studying Anahata Katkin

Kim's Journal

I finished Kim's pages and have sent them on to Priti Lisa.
Kim's artist is Anahata Katkin, whose work I love!

Anahata's paintings feature flowers and sometimes birds and other animals. . .
many beautiful faces. . . and flowing lines and pretty text. 
Since I love images like this, it was so much fun trying to work in her style.




Kim included some amazing cut-out hands for us to sign in with.
Here are the front and back of mine.




The back side of my two "Pink" ladies:

(I wish I could follow this advice, but I need to work on the faith aspect.

I tend toward a Murphy's Law philosophy... more like ~
“Leap, and then wonder what the H-E-double-toothpicks were you thinking”!)



The first four artists who work on each journal collaborate
on the front cover. The last four collaborate on the back cover.
I can't believe we are now half done, but I was the fourth one
to work on Kim's front cover. It already had such awesome art
on it and looked to me to be finished! So I added some swirly
designs ala Anahata in spots where I could!


Anahata's designs are much more graceful than mine, but it was
fun and calming to draw these, kind of like doing Zentangles :-)




Have a wonderful and safe weekend!
Happy (3-day) Memorial Day weekend, if you live in the US!

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Wednesday, May 21, 2014

Going to Class!

Studying Henri Matisse


After starting our journal collaboration where we've all chosen
artists for our individual journals, I've rediscovered how rewarding 
it is to learn more about great artists of the past.
Jeanne Oliver's class, "Studying Under the Masters"
came at just the right time!

Henri Matisse "The Lute"
“The whole arrangement of my picture is expressive,” said Matisse. 
“The place occupied by the figures or objects, the empty spaces around them, 
the proportions, everything plays a part.”


Not sure what to do with these little studies . . .
they're around 4 x 6 inches. Cut up for collage?
Postcards? Journal pages? Save in an "inspiration" folder?


Henri Matisse "Seated Odalisque"
Matisse's patterns are almost overwhelming, 
but everything works beautifully together!




Flowing palm-shaped leaves show up often in Matisse's paintings.

Henri Matisse "La Musique"



Henri Matisse "Still Life with Blue Tablecloth"


Since I discovered the paintings that were the inspiration for
these quick watercolor studies, I've come across so many more
of his patterns that I'd love to try painting.

Henri Matisse "Decorative Figure Against an Ornamental Background"

Henri Matisse "Odalisque with Yellow Persian Robe and Anemones"
Awesome!
The blue tablecloth in the painting is based on a textile which is also on display – a nineteenth-century French printed cotton and linen fabric Matisse apparently adored and called (incorrectly) his ‘toile de Jouy’.  The actual fabric consists of a delft blue pattern against a white background, but in the painting, the white is transformed into aqua, enriching the overall harmony. These imaginative transformations of subject matter prove that Matisse was not a realist, but rather an inventor of harmonies that have a tangible yet oblique relationship to reality.  Matisse uses the pattern the way he uses color, to extend his representation of the subject, whether it is still life, figure or interior.  - See more at: http://www.artcritical.com/2005/08/01/matisse-the-fabric-of-dreams-his-art-and-his-textiles/#sthash.uMi3IrLr.dpuf
The blue tablecloth in the painting is based on a textile which is also on display – a nineteenth-century French printed cotton and linen fabric Matisse apparently adored and called (incorrectly) his ‘toile de Jouy’.  The actual fabric consists of a delft blue pattern against a white background, but in the painting, the white is transformed into aqua, enriching the overall harmony. These imaginative transformations of subject matter prove that Matisse was not a realist, but rather an inventor of harmonies that have a tangible yet oblique relationship to reality.  Matisse uses the pattern the way he uses color, to extend his representation of the subject, whether it is still life, figure or interior.  - See more at: http://www.artcritical.com/2005/08/01/matisse-the-fabric-of-dreams-his-art-and-his-textiles/#sthash.uMi3IrLr.dpuf
The blue tablecloth in the painting is based on a textile which is also on display – a nineteenth-century French printed cotton and linen fabric Matisse apparently adored and called (incorrectly) his ‘toile de Jouy’.  The actual fabric consists of a delft blue pattern against a white background, but in the painting, the white is transformed into aqua, enriching the overall harmony. These imaginative transformations of subject matter prove that Matisse was not a realist, but rather an inventor of harmonies that have a tangible yet oblique relationship to reality.  Matisse uses the pattern the way he uses color, to extend his representation of the subject, whether it is still life, figure or interior.  - See more at: http://www.artcritical.com/2005/08/01/matisse-the-fabric-of-dreams-his-art-and-his-textiles/#sthash.uMi3IrLr.dpuf

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Monday, May 5, 2014

Magical Journal Journeys / Month 2


Stephanie's chosen artist for her journal is Marc Chagall.
I had so much fun studying his work. He had some kind of wild mind,
and I couldn't begin to mimic his style!

So I just incorporated some of his imagery, of which there is plenty
that appear over and over in his work.

Brides and grooms. Horses. Birds. Music. Flying. Villages.
 His native village of Vitebsk appears in so many of his paintings.

As does his wife Bella. “Her silence is mine, her eyes mine.
It is as if she knows everything about my childhood,
my present, my future, as if she can see right through me.”
(from his book, My Life)


Stephanie's pages are shaped like houses!

I ended up making my pages 2-page spreads so
I sewed them together with red thread.


The cover is a collaboration among the first four artists.
My part is the flying horse with an umbrella.
I have no idea how a horse holds an umbrella.
Maybe duct tape!




Chagall was referred to as "the quintessential Jewish artist of the twentieth century"
(though Chagall saw his work as 'not the dream of one people but of all humanity').
An early modernist, he was associated with several major artistic styles
and created works in virtually every artistic medium, including
painting, book illustrations, stained glass, stage sets,
ceramic, tapestries and fine art prints. (wikipedia)


Marc Chagall died in 1985, at nearly 98 years old.
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Sunday, May 4, 2014

The challenge is eye glasses

Spectacles

The challenge at Inspiration Avenue this week is  
Eyeglasses
I altered a piece I did a few years ago for a self portrait challenge.
I did have glasses on, but not these cool round ones.
So, after the addition of new eyes, a new nose and new mouth,
it's definitely not me anymore, but it does fit the Glasses challenge :-) 

 Head over to Inspiration Avenue to check the other entries.
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